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Posted by on Aug 9, 2014 in Emergency Procedures | 0 comments

Treating accidental amputation

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When it comes to the treatment for accidental amputations on the head, leg, back, neck and other parts of the body, the  first thing you have to do is to control bleeding, control the infections, how to preserve the body parts that is severed and save a life. Certain body parts are full of veins, nerves and arteries, and it can cause death if medical attention and care is not provided right away. As long as appropriate measures are given, the patient will survive and doctors may be able to reattach the severed parts of the body.

Treating accidental cuts on the body with first aid

Amputation

Apply pressure for 15 minutes in the affected area as a first aid measure, and if blood soaks through the cloth, apply another layer of cloth without lifting the first.

  • First thing to do is stop the bleeding. An accidental cut may not bleed very much. The blood vessels that were cut may spasm and pull back into the injured part and just shrink, thus slowing and eventually stopping the bleeding.
  • If there is bleeding, wash the hands with soap and water and put on latex gloves. If there are no gloves on hand, utilize several layers of clean cloth or any clean material obtainable that will be placed between the hands and the wound.
  • Let the injured person lie down and elevate the area that is bleeding.
  • Remove any objects in the wounds that are easy to remove and cut the clothing around the wound.
  • Apply pressure for 15 minutes in the affected area as a first aid measure, and if blood soaks through the cloth, apply another layer of cloth without lifting the first. If an object protrudes through the wound, just apply pressure around the object, not directly over it.
  • If the bleeding does not stop, continue applying direct pressure or use a tourniquet or compression bandage.
  • Check and treat shock by keeping the individual calm as possible. Stress can cause the heart to beat faster which will increase blood flow. Assure the individual that everything is fine and a help is on the way. Do some breathing exercises with the individual just to calm him/her, by inhaling slowly for five seconds and exhaling for ten seconds. This way it will reduce the risk for shock. Another way is covering the individual with warm blankets. Blood loss can cause him/her to feel cold, and there is fast heartbeat to generate body heat.
  • Wrap and cover the wounded area using sterile dressing or clean towel until help arrives.

Preserve the accidentally amputated body part

–      Preserve any accidentally amputated part of the body for a possible reattachment.

–      Rinse the severed part in water, do not use soap.

–      Place the body part in a plastic bag, and put the bag in a container with ice. This is an easy way to transport and involves less handling of the body part.

–      Give immediately the severed body part to the paramedics.

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  • All firstaidtrainingclass.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.