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Posted by on Feb 3, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Remedies for back knee pain while cycling

Fact Checked

Back knee pain while cycling is caused by a condition known as biceps tendinosis. It is characterized by the inflammation of the tendon that attaches the muscles of the hamstring to the outside of the tibia. Cycling requires repetitive movement of the knee which can result to overusing or overstretching of this tendon and eventually result to pain and injury.

Causes of back knee pain

  • Tendon impingement
  • Overuse
  • Instability or trauma of the shoulder joint
  • Rotator cuff impingement syndrome
  • Labral tears
    Back knee pain

    Pain when the knee is bend against resistance.

  • Occupations that require overhead shoulder work or performing heavy lifting.

Symptoms

  • Tenderness and swelling of the affected area
  • Posterior knee pain, especially when the knee is bent into the pedal stroke
  • Hamstring is severely tight
  • Stiffness of the leg after cycling
  • Pain when the knee is bend against resistance

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest especially the affected knee.
  • Apply an ice pack for at least 10-15 minutes every hour on the first 24-48 hours after the injury. Avoid applying the pack directly on the skin to prevent further damage. Wrap an ice pack with a towel before placing on the area.
  • Wear an elastic type support for the knee that lessens the swelling and provides support for the joint.
  • If the injury is a long-term chronic condition, apply heat using a heating pad or warm compress on the affected area.
  • Take the prescribed anti-inflammatory pain medication such as ibuprofen in the early stages to lessen the pain, inflammation and swelling.
  • Massage the affected knee to restore flexibility and for fast healing of the condition. Start massaging the area after the first 48 hours. If bending of the knee causes pain, avoid massage therapy.
  • Perform rehabilitation exercises such as stretching and strengthening as soon as the pain allows with the help of a physical therapist.

Tips

  • Adjust the position of the saddle. If the seat is too high or too far back, it forces the leg to stretch farther and placing high stress in the posterior area of the knee and overstretching the tendon.
  • Proper warm up before training or competition
  • Stretch and strengthen the muscles
  • Massage regularly the tendon and muscles for proper conditioning.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on back knee pain from cycling is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize and manage joint issues by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

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  • All firstaidtrainingclass.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.

The information posted on this page is for educational purposes only.
If you need medical advice or help with a diagnosis contact a medical professional

  • All firstaidtrainingclass.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.

  • All firstaidtrainingclass.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.